Shelbyville Daily Union

Community News Network

December 23, 2013

Boy asked for football, air rifle in 114-year-old letter to Santa

Harry Hyland, age 8, wrote in his loopy cursive on Dec. 21, 1899: "Dear Santa Claus, Please bring me a football, an air rifle and a golf stick. Your little friend, Harry W. Hyland."

A reflection of the times -- and maybe Harry's behavior -- comes in a follow-up letter two weeks later: "Dear Santa Claus, Thank you for my top, my cap, my handkerchief, my gloves, my candy and my nuts and my hook and ladder.”

The letters Harry wrote in his third grade class at the Wingate School in Haverhill, Mass., 114 years ago are rekindling the spirit of Christmas for one family. Harry’s grandson, 63-year-old Joseph P. Blanchette, believes them to be the oldest “Dear Santa” letters on record, based on information from the Miami, Fla.-based World Record Academy.

For nearly a decade at Christmas time, Blanchette – a native of Lawrence, Mass., who now lives in Vermont -- has broken out the two letters to share with his family.

“I hang them up on the wall or set them up in the house,” Blanchette, 63, a retired high school history teacher, said of the letters — both of them preserved in picture frames.

“It’s always kind of an interesting discussion point this time of year. It triggers people to start telling stories on their own — about what Christmas Eve was like, or writing letters to Santa or what Santa brought them,” Blanchette said.

The earliest date of verifiable letters to Santa belongs to two children from Dublin, Ireland in 1911, according to World Record Academy. The children asked Santa for a baby doll, a waterproof with a hood, a pair of gloves, a toffee apple, a gold penny, a silver sixpence and a long toffee.

That record still stands, Tom Howard of the academy confirmed in an email to The Eagle-Tribune.

Text Only
Community News Network
  • The Simpsons still going strong

    The groundbreaking animation first hit the air Dec. 17, 1989, but the family first appeared on television in "The Tracey Ullman Show" short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987.

    August 21, 2014

  • Police chief resigns over racial slur repost to Facebook

    A repost on his personal Facebook page of a racially-charged comment by the original poster of a comedy video has forced the police chief of an Oklahoma city to resign his office.

    August 21, 2014

  • Does Twitter need a censor?

    Twitter decided last year to make images more prominent on its site. Now, the social network is finding itself caught between being an open forum and patrolling for inappropriate content.

    August 21, 2014

  • sleepchart.jpg America’s sleep-deprived cities

    Americans might run on sleep, but those living in the country's largest cities don't appear to run on much.

    August 20, 2014 1 Photo

  • Who should pay for your kids ACT?

    Thirteen states paid for 11th-grade students in all public high schools to take the ACT college admission test this year, with several more planning to join them in 2015.

    August 20, 2014

  • Pets.jpg Why do people look like their pets?

    As much as we might quibble over the virtues and vices of Canis domesticus, however, and over whether human nature is any better or worse than dog nature, even dog fanciers don't usually want to look like a dog.

    August 20, 2014 1 Photo

  • Ice bucket challenge trending up

    Internet trends are a dime a dozen these days. Everything from Tebowing to planking to the cinnamon challenge can cause a wave of social media activity that can last for weeks before fizzling out.

    August 19, 2014

  • Africa goes medieval in its fight against Ebola

    As the Ebola epidemic claims new victims at an ever-increasing rate, African governments in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia have instituted a "cordon sanitaire," deploying troops to forcibly isolate the inhabitants in an area containing most of the cases.

    August 18, 2014

  • Democrat? Republican? There's an app for that

    If you're a Republican, you might want to think twice before buying Lipton Iced Tea, and forget about Starbucks coffee. If you're a Democrat, put down that Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, and throw away the cylinder of Quaker Oats in your pantry.

    August 18, 2014

  • Five myths about presidential vacations

    In the nuclear age, presidents may have only minutes to make a decision that could affect the entire world. They don't so much leave the White House as they take a miniature version of it with them wherever they go.

    August 15, 2014