Shelbyville Daily Union

April 17, 2013

13 Fire Departments respond to oil tank fire Tuesday

VALORIE EVERSOLE - Daily Union Reporter
CNHI

SHELBYVILLE, IL. —

With the help of 12 other fire departments, Shelbyville Fire Department battled a type of fire they had no experience for.

Tuesday afternoon lightning struck a large oil storage tank containing about 3,000 gallons of crude oil southeast of Clarksburg on 600N, about a half mile east of 2050E. The strike caused the top of the tank to be blown into the air, taking out a power line and barely missing a metal storage building before landing more than 100 yards to the east of the fire. The force of the landing plunged the tank three feet into the ground.

"It was a confirmed lightning strike - neighbor saw it," said SFPD engineer William "Perk" Wilson.

The department arrived on the scene about 2:20 p.m. and immediately began calling for help from other departments for water and foam chemical to smother the flames. More than 100 personnel and 25 pieces of equipment, including tankers, responded to the call. Local fire fighters have not been trained for this kind of incident, but knew that the fire needed to be smothered because water alone would only spread the flames.

"In my 31 years as a fire fighter, I've never seen anything like that," said SFPD fire chief Gary Lynch. "We've had small scale barrel training, but this was out first actual oil storage incident. It was pretty fast-paced."

Another concern were nearby tank containing xylene, which is extremely flammable, and other tanks with inhibitors, which were not explosive but were flamable.

The fire was contained to a 30-foot by 70 foot area thanks to an earthen dam around the storage tanks. It took a little more than four hours to get it under control. 

"We had to use the water to keep those tanks cool," Lynch said.

A storage building on the site was also destroyed in the fire.

The oil storage tank is owned by Illini Resources. The land is owned by Russell Slifer. No injuries were reported.

"The guys did an outstanding job. It was a dangerous situation and there was a lot of adrenaline flowing," Lynch said. "It was such an unusually incident. I hope to never see anything like that again in my career." 

Windsor, Strasburg, Stewardson, Shumway, Sullivan, Bethany, Findlay, Tower Hill, Pana, Cowden, Beecher City, and Taylorville responded to the scene with mutual aid.

"I want to say thank you to all the departments. We couldn't have done it without them," Lynch said.